Focus on subsea

The exhibition at the Underwater Technology Conference focuses solely on subsea related areas. The technology company Naxys, which recently was acquired by GE Measurement & Control, has attended the UTC as an exhibitor three times.

Published: 14 May 2013

- Exhibiting at the UTC has been of great benefit

Companies visiting the conference are either involved in underwater technology, or act as suppliers to this sector. Hence, the exhibition is a very important aspect of the strong subsea theme on which the conference is centred. The conference has been an important instrument in raising awareness of our technology, says Stian Bentsen, Business Development Manager at Naxys. It enables us to meet with key players in the subsea industry.

Of all the events during UTC, the exhibition is without question the most important meeting point. This is where new business relations are established. Furthermore, many use the UTC as an opportunity to showcase their products and profile their companies.

- We have been able to discuss our solutions and present our technology to some of the largest oil companies in the world. In the early years of Naxys, getting in contact with these players would have been difficult. The UTC is a conference aimed at the subsea industry. This gathering of the sector's best operators worldwide has been valuable to us, says Bentsen.

Subsea Leak detection

Naxys is a technology company specialising in remote subsea monitoring. One of its key product offerings is leak detection. Naxys has developed a sensing technology through which it is possible to detect leaks from the subsea installation and nearby equipment.

- The system recognises the sound generated by a leak, and ensures immediate awareness of the situation. In the end, the Naxys Leak Detectors provide data essential for optimizing risk prevention in a subsea environment, says Bentsen.

The company has supplied and installed a number of leak detectors on the Norwegian Continental Shelf as well as internationally.

Subsea Condition Monitoring

A growing application for Naxys is subsea condition monitoring, which uses similar detection principles as leak detection. An acoustic & electric sensing station is positioned on the subsea installation. This allows monitoring of critical subsea equipment, such as sound valves, pumps, compressors, etc, identifying abnormalities in operation via detection of the equipment’s acoustic and electric stray fields.

- If the acoustic or electric field changes from normal operational signature, the Operator will be notified with the data necessary to investigate and take appropriate action to avoid costly downtime, says Bentsen. The equipment’s normal behaviour is acquired through self-learning normal behaviour algorithms.

- Based on years of research development and qualification, the subsea sensors are specifically designed for subsea conditions, and are qualified to a 25 year or longer life span. This monitoring technology provide valuable information on the condition of subsea machinery, and will, as an example, allow for accurate measurement of the effectiveness of a subsea pump, says Bentsen.

- A winning combination

Naxys was established in 1999, and has worked to develop and optimise the technology ever since. On September 12th 2012, GE announced its acquisition of Naxys, which is beginning a new era for this Bergen-based company.

- Naxys was of interest to GE because of its unique technology and the expanding segment in which the company operates. Norway is at the forefront globally in the fields of environmental monitoring and development of future subsea factories, and Naxys places GE in a unique position in terms of leak detection and condition monitoring of subsea installations, says Fabian Dawson, Vertical Sales Leader at GE Measurement & Control.

The acquisition provides Naxys with access to an extensive customer portfolio and a wide range of complementary GE technologies that may contribute to the further development of the company's solutions.

- To us, this is an opportunity beyond compare, says Bentsen.

More information on this year's conference and exhibition on www.utc.no.